04 July 2018

More of J-R Meunier's work





See yesterday's post for more background on these works that I photographed in the pottery village called La Borne. The Centre Céramique Contemporaine was displaying an amazing range of objects in all different styles when we were there last month.

I like the one on the right here especially for the colors, patterns, and textures. Like many of Meunier's characters, this one seems to be walking. Moving. Only a few of the characters are standing still or seated.




Why is this man riding a pig? Notice that it seems to be a piggybank. This man is also on the move. I suppose there is humor here. Why is nobody wearing shoes?

By the way, a piggybank in French is une tirelire. The word probably comes from Italian, where tire means to throw, and lire means coins.






This figure is riding a horse, as you can see. It looks like a merry-go-round horse to me. Life is a carousel?


La Pomme


This objet is called « La Pomme ». Would that be « La Grosse Pomme » ("The Big Apple")? I don't know anything about the artist's experience, but New York might be a favorite subject of his. Thanks to Diogenes for the point he made yesterday and the link to a 1930s photo taken in that city.






I think this must be a horse too. Probably has a certain spring in his step. Again, so many barefooted people moving forward. But going nowhere?

17 comments:

  1. Happy Fourth to the American commenters. Let’s hope by the next one Donnie LXV will be gone and forgotten! One can dream, can one?

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    1. For some reason, the second and third photos make me think of Sancho Panza and Don Quixote respectively!

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    2. Thanks, CHM. Your fete is ten days away now. I love them both.

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    3. chm did you mean XV, or XIV or XVI?

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    4. Isn't 45 in Roman numerals XLV?

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    5. Yes, Ken, you're right. What I wrote wwas 65 when I meant 45. Thanks for the correction.

      D, XIV, XV or XVI would have been too classy!

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    6. chm I thought you meant an analogy to Louis XV, so I was thinking of Louis XIV or Louis XVI.

      I wasn;t thinking of US president #s, lol.

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  2. The little folk also have serious problems with their neck vertebrae.

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    1. They are rubber-neckers. Do you know that term?

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    2. Yes ! However, do you know 'pain in the neck'? No wonder they are sad! Are these designed as wall lights or is this an enlightened way for their display?

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    3. I don't understand your question about these being wall lights. I do know what pain in the neck means. I didn't know whether rubber-necking and rubber-necker were specifically American expressions. I guess I need to look them up in the Collins-Robert dictionary, or on dictionary.com, which both give notes on U.S. and British usage.

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    4. Previous post photos I thought were backlit, on second , better, look they are spot lit. My bad! Do you know 'Gongoozler' that relates especially to canal watching. It's a bit more laid-back than rubber-necking. Love our language.

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  3. Meunier is starting to grow on me. That pig piece is funny. I looked up piggy back and somehow it really means like a back pack which makes sense.

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  4. Many of his pieces have a 70s vibe in a good way.

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  5. There is a famous CA artist that did these kind of humorous ceramics. Sorry for the long link:

    https://www.google.com/search?q=david+gilhooly+frog&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiXtq7gg4bcAhWCilQKHb2_CUoQsAQIKA&biw=1920&bih=943#imgrc=_

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