18 March 2012

Plum progress

I mentioned the other day that our plum trees were starting to flower and posted a picture of some flower buds. Well, the nice weather we had during the week — as warm and sunny as in June — didn't hurt at all. Now look.

These are two trees that I planted from plum pits a few years back. They are wild plums from an ungrafted tree, and I already got a few of the little red plums last year. This year I'm hoping for enough to make confiture. Plum jam, or confiture de prunes, is just about my favorite.

14 comments:

  1. My plum tree is catching up. Do you treat the tree? Mine always have worms and I'm thinking about spraying something on it this year.

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  2. We have two plum trees. The wild one is about in the same blooming condition as yours. I made lots of plum jam. The other one is the child of the greengage plum tree we had to chop down a few years ago. It has a hard time producing any fruit. But I still keep hoping. Last year, we discovered that a new tree growing in the narrow walkway to the backyard is a plum tree, but the fruit was too high up yo get.

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  3. I haven't noticed anything in Preuilly blossoming, but a few fruit trees have flowers over in the Brenne I noticed yesterday.

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  4. I do hope you enjoy your spring. Your photos are absolutely lovely. Good luck with the plums

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  5. Plum jam, plum pie, plum crumble, plum clafoutis, plum yum yum !!

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  6. woa they grow fast if those grew from pits.....

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  7. Like Melinda, I'm impressed with the fact that the pit you planted is paying off already. Your plum jam is delicious for sure.

    I still favor those yellow plums that grow just beyond your back gate- Miam, maim!

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  8. "plum yum yum" Jean... good one :))

    This is exciting news about the plum tree, Ken!

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  9. We just had a hailstorm here on the Aigronne - woe to early blossom!

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  10. Yes, Tim, those poor blossoms! Having grésil this time of year is typical — ce sont les giboulées du mois de mars. I don't see it as real hail, just tiny ice pellets. Real hail falls in the summer around here. We are getting an averse de grésil or gibouléeright this minute.

    Evelyn you are right that those yellow plums were the best ever, but we don't see them every year. I just looked back and saw that it was two years ago when I planted the little plum trees that are now covered in blossoms. I must have had them in pots for at least a year, maybe two, before planting them in the ground.

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  11. Hi Meredith, no we don't treat the tree and yes, we do get some worms in the plums. Depends on the year.

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  12. My apricot and peach started blossoming this week too. I've had them in pots for a year now dithering about where to plant them in the ground...

    On the subject of trees - what are the trees that line every other French street and square with tied and shaped branches as per the first photo here: http://mikenbondi.blogspot.fr/2012/03/going-rural.html ??

    They're just not familiar to my antipodean eucalypt-trained eyes...

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  13. Mike, those surely are plane trees — platanes in French.

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  14. Thank you Ken, I never would have recognised those as plane trees, due to the practice I now know of called "pollarding" to get those strangely attenuated branches

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