27 May 2017

Maisons de Saint-Aignan

On the south bank of the Cher River, on one of the main roads coming into Saint-Aignan from the west, is a small complex of buildings occupied by the Hôtel du Moulin. There's also a big parking lot where you can leave your car and walk into town — to the Saturday morning open-air market in the old town, for example. When we first came here in 2002, there was a restaurant in the main building, but it closed down years ago. We had our first meal in Saint-Aignan there, 15 years ago.


On the main street that runs through town, one of the houses you see is the one below, which is 500 or 600 years old. A few years ago, a strong gust of wind blew one of its chimneys off. Bricks came crashing down onto the street. Luckily, nobody was injured.




The house above was built in the 1400s, so it's one of the oldest houses in the town. It's also on the main street, which is of course open to car traffic (one way).


I think the one above is very picturesque. It's on a side street just next to the main entrance of the old church. I don't know anything about the history of the house.


Finally, this house is on the château grounds. It used to be the château's gatehouse, but now it is operated as a vacation rental or gîte by one of the sons of the woman who owns and lives in the château.

10 comments:

chm said...

If I'm not mistaken, the last photo shows the maison de Sidonie.

Ken Broadhurst said...

That's right. The other gîte on the château grounds is the maison de Léonard. It's the one down on the river road, on the left as you head toward Mareuil and points beyond.

Evelyn said...

All are so lovely to look at.

Anonymous said...

would you have any idea how to reach the chateau to inguire about the gite?

Ken Broadhurst said...

Here's a link to the Grilles du Château web site. Click on Our Lodges to see the two gîtes they rent out.

Autolycus said...

I can't help it, but "la maison de Sidonie" conjures up memories of Clochemerle...

chm said...

I've read Clochemerle so many years ago, I barely remember what it's about!

Ken Broadhurst said...

It's about the installation of a urinal in the fictional village of Clochemerle:

Le roman commence quand Barthélemy Piéchut, le maire de la commune de Clochemerle-en-Beaujolais, dévoile à Ernest Tafardel, l'instituteur, son projet : « Je veux faire construire un urinoir, Tafardel. […] Enfin, dit-il, une pissotière ! ».

Cette vespasienne, destinée, bien plus peut-être, à confondre madame la baronne Alphonsine de Courtebiche, le curé Ponosse, le notaire Girodot et les suppôts de la réaction, qu'à procurer un grand soulagement à la gent virile de Clochemerle, est édifiée tout près de l'église où Justine Putet, vieille demoiselle, exerce une surveillance étroite.

Seine Judeet (Judith) said...

Woo hoo! That does look like La Maison de Sidonie! That's where we'll be staying! The one day I miss the blog :) I'm just about to email Madame la Marquise, in fact!

Titania Staeheli said...

I love the look of the old houses, memories of Switzerland where I spend my childhood. Also love the stories impromtu.