29 December 2015

The pot pie plus...

So we made the chicken pot pie yesterday, and it was pretty good. We had gravy left from Saturday, and we still had plenty of turkey — half the bird, or nearly. I put diced carrots, chopped onion, and frozen green peas along with some of the white and dark turkey meat cut into chunks.

Jacques Pépin's method for béchamel sauce was the basis for the gravy, except that I substituted turkey poaching broth with some crème fraîche added for the milk Pépin uses.

I think this is called just a "chicken pie" or "meat pie" in countries other than the U.S., where "pot" pies are a kitchen standard.

The gravy is 100 grams of butter (6 Tbsp.) melted in a saucepan and then 6 Tbsp. of flour added to cook in the butter. Pour half a liter of liquid into the butter-flour mixture all at once and stir energetically with a whisk as it come to the boil. The liquid can be milk or broth, or broth with cream added. That's what I did. Adjust the salt and pepper accordingly.

Walt had some of his good shortcrust (aka regular pie crust or pâte brisée) waiting in the freezer, so he took it out the day before to thaw in the fridge. Yesterday he rolled it out and laid it on top of the cooled pot pie filling. The pie baked in the oven at 350ºF (180ºC) for about half an hour, and then sat and cooled for 10 minutes before we spooned out our servings at the table for lunch. We had romaine lettuce with a Caesar-type dressing as our salad.


Yesterday morning I took a camera out on my walk with Callie. The temperature on our thermometer at the house was well above freezing, but out in the vineyard there was a light frost. That was the first time in a while. The sun was just coming up at 8:45 a.m. Today the early morning temperature is back up to nearly 50ºF (9.5ºC or so). I think it might be raining lightly.

The recent mild weather, with just the right amount of rain, has been very kind to my collard greens. Above is the biggest plant, and you can see how it is thriving. Predictions I just heard on Télématin promise us more normal winter temperatures starting the first week of the new year. I'll have to keep an eye on the collards and maybe pull the plants out if it looks like we're going to have a really hard freeze.

9 comments:

Kristi in the Western Reserve said...

One of my favorite meals, chicken pot pie! Oh, dear, and it's about 1:30 in the morning and not time to eat....You collard greens look great. Perhaps even though it is still pretty warm, there is much less insect activity in the garden now. I think we are getting colder weather here now and I hope it will snow so my grandchildren can do some outdoor sledding and skiing this vacation.

NotesFromAbroad said...

Not only must it be delicious but it is the prettiest pot pie I have seen ! I haven't had one of those in years ! and never home made .. my mother was good friends with Mr Swanson .. (Swansons frozen dinners)

Ken Broadhurst said...

One of the things we've enjoyed about home cooking in France is making from scratch so many American dishes that we would never have made but only bought already prepared or cooked over there. The home-made versions are always better (e.g. our pot pie vs. Swanson's frozen ones.

Evelyn said...

What a beautiful collard plant! My niece's cherry trees are blooming in VA. I've seen star magnolias with a couple of blooms here. My pansies are having a perfect winter so far. Homemade food is so much healthier without the additives.

Ken Broadhurst said...

I noticed a new rose on one of our rose bushes today. Very unusual.

Ken Broadhurst said...

I think there is less insect and snail/slug damage to my collard plants now than in summer and early autumn, but I heard a report on the radio today saying that insect damage to crops across France is worse now than what would normally be expected.

Ken Broadhurst said...

I think there is less insect and snail/slug damage to my collard plants now than in summer and early autumn, but I heard a report on the radio today saying that insect damage to crops across France is worse now than what would normally be expected.

NotesFromAbroad said...

There is absolutely no doubt in my mind about that ! And then, also, there are times when you can eat a piece of bread with a slice of tomato on it , while you sit in the sun in France and that adds up to the best sandwich you ever ate :) right ?

Seine Judeet (Judith) said...

Here in St. Louis, we are having major, serious flooding. Major sections of major highways are flooded over! It's nuts!