22 August 2015

Survival

Yes, our survival, but it's not so much about that. The weather has turned really hot again, and I got very little sleep last night. I got up at 4:00 a.m. because I got tired of tossing and turning.


I'm happy, however, to report that my collard greens out in the garden have survived the earlier attack by pests called "flea beetles."


Wikipedia says that flea beetles often attack cruciferous plants (cabbages) including collards, rape (canola), and mustard. And kale too, I can tell you. That's what happened here in July.


The Wiki article continues: "Flea beetles execute their most severe attacks during dry weather and are most active on sunny days. The larvae are known to chew roots." The adult beetles feed on leaves. During the infestation this summer, they ate all my kale seedlings, but they couldn't kill off the hardy collards. It looks like I'll have a good collard crop this fall.


We are also going to have a good crop of tomatoes, along with all the zucchini and winter squashes that are growing out there. Smaller tomatoes are coming in plentifully already, and the larger varieties are really starting to ripen.

10 comments:

Susan said...

Chenonceau had the tattiest looking crucifers this year, so if professional gardeners can't hold flea beetles at bay, what chance have the rest of us got. On the other hand, Villandry's looked absolutely fine, but they planted them out much later. Curiously, I haven't had a problem with them this year. I'm amazed, and this is the first year I have successfully grown any sort of crucifer.

LaPré DelaForge said...

That's gardening... some years you win... some you lose...

Ken Broadhurst said...

My kale seedlings were still in a planter box on the front porch when the beetles got to them.

Bob Rossi said...

I think it's also flea beetles that can do a number on arugula.

Gosia k said...

your colard looks healthy

Seine Judeet (Judith) said...

Gorgeous maters!

LaPré DelaForge said...

Yep, Bob...
They absolutely adore "roquet", rocket, arooogla....
more than any other member of the cabbage family, I think...
the flavour is the same, but you have to eat all round the little holes...
seriously, tho', flea beetles are a real hazard for all young crucifers...
and, as Ken and Walt are only 40K north of us, they probably have all the same species....
there is a "sumo" flea beetle here... size of a Swan Vesta household matchhead....
bright, metallic blue... and thighs like a Tour de France mountain specialist...
and, possibly an appetite to match.

Evelyn said...

Every year a garden tells a different story.

Simon Bate said...

I had flea beetles a while ago. I'm not a fan of poisons, so I sprayed (puffed?) diatomaceous earth on the affected plants, which took care of the beasties quite quickly.

Bob Rossi said...

Thanks for the tip. I'll have to try it. I'm not sure I've ever seen the flea beetles at my garden, only the result of their work.