21 June 2015

Lunch in Montoire

What did we have for lunch in Montoire that Saturday? Chez Françoise (Le Café de la Paix) has a varied menu, including a daily special or two, a full range of both savory buckwheat pancakes (galettes) and sweet crêpes, as well as several different omelettes.


That day, there was a three course menu that CHM ordered. The first course was what they called une salade de crudités, but it was an unusual one, I think. It was very good though, and I ordered the same salad as my starter course.


Above is CHM's photo of the crudités or vegetable plate, which was made up of some salade piémontaise (potato salad), some chopped cabbage salad with golden raisins, and some sliced cucumbers.


My main course was the omelette that I had had in mind all morning. French omelets are usually served baveuse or runny, and this cheese omelet was a good example.


CHM had the goulash as his main course (his photo above). Hungarian goulash is a kind of pot au feu or stew made with beef, pork, or veal — or a combination — cooked in a broth flavored with sweet paprika and served with potatoes or noodles. Some hot paprika can be added to enhance the flavor, and onions are a standard ingredient. It's the paprika that makes it goulash.


To wash it all down, we ordered a small carafe of the local red wine. It was light and tasty. I don't really know what grapes went into it, but there was probably some Pineau d'Aunis and maybe some Pinot Noir or Gamay. Dessert was the daily special: far breton, a kind of pudding cake made with prunes.

11 comments:

chm said...

Perhaps because it was the first time ever I had gulash, I wasn't too impressed by it, even though it was good. But the salad! Oh! that was delicious. The combination of ingredients and seasoning was outstanding. The far breton was equally scrumptious.

Ken Broadhurst said...

I'm making gulash (goulash? goulache? gulyas?) for today's lunch, using veal shoulder, a trio of paprikas (mild, hot, smoked), etc. I'll have to take some photos.

Susan said...

Hungarian goulash was one of my mother's regular dishes when I was growing up. The beef was cut into strips and it was finished with sour cream and served with buttered noodles.

Jerry E Beuterbaugh said...

"The Life in Saint-Aignan" has been included in our A Sunday Drive for this week. Be assured that we hope this helps to point even more new visitors in your direction.

http://asthecrackerheadcrumbles.blogspot.com/2015/06/a-sunday-drive_21.html

Ken Broadhurst said...

I've always had noodles or pasta with goulash, but most of the French recipes, including the ones in the Larousse Gastronomique, call for potatoes. The goulash chez Françoise was served that way, as you saw. Ginette Mathiot (Je sais cuisiner, a 1970 classic of French home cooking) also puts potatoes in her "goulasch"... And so does Monique Maine (Cuisine pour toute l'année, 1969). Despite all that, I'm making veal goulash and having pasta with it.

Ken Broadhurst said...

Thanks, Jerry.

Gosia k said...

Wow delicious mael and so similar to mine

Bob Rossi said...

Having seen the wine bottles yesterday and the food today, I'm ready for lunch at Chez Francoise if we ever make it back to that area. On the other hand, the lunch you're making also sounds great. But just try getting veal shoulder in the US. On our recent trip to France we picked up veal chops to grill two days in a row at 2 different butcher shops, and both were outstanding. Good veal chops are also almost impossible to find at butchers here.

Evelyn said...

Ah, it's FAR breton that I like. I tasted goulash for the first time in Budapest and it was wonderful as many first tastes are!

Diogenes said...

Susan my mother made the same version of goulash when we were growing up in Texas. I was so-so on it, but it was filling.

Seine Judeet (Judith) said...

I've see a photo and recipe for FAR breton, but don't remember much about it.
Love these photos of food -- always!