01 February 2015

Inside the church in Montréal

The interior of the church in the village of Montréal in Burgundy is all white, which makes it very luminous. The church was built in the 12th century and restored in the 19th.


Its claim to fame is a set of 26 elaborately carved oak choir stalls dating back to the 16th century. The two figures below are supposedly the sculptors' self-portrait. They're having a drink during one of the breaks in their workday. King François 1er funded their work in the 1520s.


The old bell below, installed in the church in 1623, was replaced in 1994. The church doesn't have a bell tower; the defensive tower over the nearby upper gate (La Porte d'En-Haut) in the town's fortifications served that purpose.


Here's a photo showing the Porte d'En-Haut, where the church bells were located. Thanks to Google Maps street view.


More photos of the wood carvings inside the church tomorrow...

8 comments:

Gosia k said...

I love white churches inside they look so clean

Tim said...

Wonderful carving...
something tells me that you were most taken by Montréal??

Ken Broadhurst said...

Montréal was a very pretty place and the weather was sunny after all the morning rain we had suffered through.

It's snowing here right now, by the way. I don't know it it is just going to melt as it hits the ground. Time will tell.

chm said...

This humble village church is beautiful, as well as the carvings. I wonder if the villageois will go around it with lit candles tomorrow at Candle Mass?

À la Chandeleur,
L'hiver finit ou reprend rigueur.


Tomorrow is also crêpes day. Don't miss it.

anne marie in philly said...

it survives well into the 21st century.

Evelyn said...

Are the carvings done on walnut? The Montreal countryside is my favorite part of your trip report so far although I've enjoyed every episode.

ellen a. said...

The stone carving of the lady or abbesse on the upper right is striking. Is it part of the floor? Original to the old church or a creation of Viollet le Duc's do you think? I am also intrigued by the twin symbols to either side of her head. I suppose they could be crowns, caskets of jewels, or incense burners, but my inner child sees them as robot hamburgers!
I don't often comment on blogs, but do want to thank you so much for your fidelity in daily postings. Your photos are exquisite and you are so generous in sharing your experiences and knowledge of France. I often miss a few days of your postings, then come back to the website for a brief vacation from the stresses of life in the States. My husband and I plan to make France our retirement home as well in a few years. You two make it look easy!

Ken Broadhurst said...

Hello ellen a., my memory has that carved panel not on the floor but either part of a wall or standing up against an inside wall of the church. I can't find any photos of it on any of the sites I've scanned. Thank you for your kind comments.