02 November 2013

Nasturtium flowers

I think these flowers have an unfortunate name in English. It makes you think of the word "nasty" — which the flowers are not. In French, they're called capucines, which suits them better.


Our weather seems to be back on schedule. It started raining yesterday, November 1, which is La Toussaint in France. The rains always seem to start at the beginning of November. It's not cold though — 15ºC this morning, nearly 60ºF, but windy and wet.


These capucine plants grow in one of our vegetable garden plots. They seem to like our chalky soil, and they reseed themselves every year. They would really take over if we didn't pull them out regularly. I took these pictures on October 30; I can't remember if it had rained or if we just had a heavy dew.


The months go flying by. Les jours se suivent et se ressemblent, sauf le temps qu'il fait. Mais plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose.

7 comments:

  1. I just can't get Nasties to grow here...
    They are more attractive to Cabbij Whites than Cabbij!!
    Also the whole plant is edible...
    flowers are wonderful in salads, cruchy and sweet at the tip of the horn...
    the leaves and seeds are peppery.
    The seeds can also be used instead of capers...
    but it just doesn't want to germinate here!!!
    Alaska... a short bushy one with green and white speckled leaves is particularly attractive.

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  2. Tim, maybe your soil is too rich for the capucines. Ours is pretty poor, despite our 9 years of composting and amending.

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  3. I love them! The Hungarian name is similar since they look slightly like the hoods of Capuchine monks.

    But they are not the real nasturtiums. The name means nose twister. The real nasturtiums are water cress. You can pickle the seeds of your flowers and they are like capers and use flower and leaf parts in salad, but I'm sure you know that.

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  4. i'm getting caught up with you - reading the posts of the last week. just wanted to say how great that you got the J Pepin book! you must be thrilled. last year i received a signed cookbook from my fav celebrity chef and it nearly gave me the vapors.... ;-) so happy for you - such a generous gift. happy cooking!

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  5. You hadn't mentioned the fragrance of nastursiums! I like their aroma.
    Maybe I'll give the deer some dessert and grow them next year. My friend has them and as you say, they replant themselves each year!

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  6. Hi Ken ,you might find this link interesting ,with the meaning of Nasturtium ..

    http://en.canadianflowerdelivery.com/flower-meaning/nasturtium.aspx

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