27 March 2012

Le Château de Cheverny

Cheverny is one of the big four châteaus on the east side of Tours in the Loire Valley — along with Chenonceau, Chambord, and Chaumont. I guess I should add Amboise and Blois too.

The Château de Cheverny was built in the 1700s, about a century later than most of the other main châteaus of the region. It stands out by its fine classical architecture, and it's known for its sumptuous furnishings and its pack of hunting dogs.

It's not a very big château, in fact, but its proportions are harmonious. And it stands in the middle of a 250-acre park that is beautifully manicured.

Cheverny is probably the most interesting château around here for its interiors and decoration. It's been owned and occupied — still today — by successive generations of the same family for its entire existence.

Cheverny is just half an hour north of Saint-Aignan by car, and about the same distance south of Blois. It's even closer to 16th-century Chambord, and the contemporaneous Château de Villesavin is close by as well.

The photos here are some that I took in April 2004 when I visited Cheverny for the first time, before I started blogging. I've been back to Cheverny several times since then. You have to pay to get in, but it's worth the price.

11 comments:

  1. We agree Ken, it's worth the price except Sue bought a very expensive leather handbag at the gift shop on the way out.

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  2. Leon- haaa :)))

    Ken, thanks for these photos. I love the side table and the fruit basket in that last photo!

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  3. The interior suits my tastes;) The colors of the fireplace tiles are duplicated in the rug and furniture.

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  4. Evelyn

    If you like the interior, then for sure you will love the interior of le Musée Nissim de Camondo in Paris. http://www.lesartsdecoratifs.fr/francais/nissim-de-camondo/l-hotel-et-les-collections/parcours-132/

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  5. Hi, Judy, I'm sorry I never answered your gardening question. As for working the soil, if there is a lot of grass or rooty weeds, pull them out after you've worked the soil. Or leave them to rot (compost) if you're not planting right away. The main thing is to turn the soil over to aerate it and loosen it up. If it's never been worked before, as was the case at our house, add compost year after year to improve it. But things will grow well in it from the beginning if you work it well and water it enough.

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  6. Ah, Cheverny! The photo I took of you and Ray walking up to the front entrance has been my desktop background for years. I'm reminded every day of our wonderful visit with you.

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  7. Thank you for reminding me of a wonderful visit I had there in 2006. As usual, your photos are delightful.

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  8. Leon, Happy Birthday. Hope you have enjoyed the day. Or are enjoying it.

    Hi Susan, I don't think I have a copy of that picture. Is it too big to send by e-mail? I'd like to see it again, and maybe post it.

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  9. We were there the other day with clients. They are gearing up for a year of Tintin following the release of the Spielberg movie, and there was a conservator working on the interior painted panels.

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  10. I sent the image to your wanadoo.fr email account. That's the latest one I have for you. Let me know if there's another address I should use.

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